In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

IX. In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

This year, I decided I wanted to read more classics.

Okay fine. LAST year I decided I wanted to read more classics. So I asked for this one. For Christmas. In 2006. Was that two years ago? It’s really hard to tell, time just blurs sometimes, you know?

So I finally got around to reading this one. I threw it in with this August push I made to finish reading Every Half-Read Book On My Shelf. This was my final frontier – the last book on my shelf for the last few days of my challenge. And I didn’t honestly think I was going to finish – it’s a fat book, I had at least 200 pages left, and BOY were those words in small type.

But strangely enough, I found myself reading more and more, faster and faster. The story is a dark one, made even moreso because, well, it’s 100% true. A prominent but humble farming family of four is found murdered in their small Kansas town. The search for the killers is at first, fruitless, but since this was all written after years of careful research and almost complete story-immersion by Capote, the reader is introduced to the real murders early, and watch the pair of ex-cons drive around the US, hiding from both their crime as well as their general disregard for the Rules of Society.

I watched Capote, the movie based upon the writing of this book, before reading it. So I knew the ending. But I found myself racing toward the finish line anyway, unsure if I was supposed to feel mercy for these Cold Blooded Killers and wait for a last minute pardon, or if I was supposed to be glad justice would finally be served. I’ve never read another book like this. I added it to the extremely short list of Classics I Actually Enjoyed Reading.

Buy this for: your best friend who can’t get enough true crime stories, or pair it with Capote and give it to your favorite creative writing major. It makes for a great examination of writing vs life, story vs. reality, writer vs. written word.

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2 Responses to “In Cold Blood by Truman Capote”

  1. I’ve linked to your helpful review at the end of mine which you can read (and comment on!) HERE if you want.

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